Twitching

October 22nd, 2003  |  Published in Uncategorized

For those joining in who haven’t seen the other site, here’s an entry from Stork, which is getting rolled into Puddingtime! -mph

Sitting around on a Saturday night.

Just finished a viewing of “Heat,” and I’m trying to think of a way to characterize what happened to Al Pacino. “Heat” wasn’t his “last great role” or anything dramatic like that: he was headed downhill after being richly rewarded for AC-TING!! in “Scent of a Woman.” But in “Heat” there’s plenty to remind us of why he was great, and plenty to remind us that his conception of passion increasingly involves behavior I’ve never been exposed to among normal adults.

Alison says “What the hell is up with the baby?” and tugs her shirt up over her belly. It’s moving around with sharp little motions, like when our cats twitch their flanks. She’s been feeling the baby for weeks, and I’ve spent a lot of time sitting next to her with my hand on her belly trying to feel it, too. Frankly, it’s a little annoying sometimes: I don’t want to take it personally when the baby stops moving the second I put my hand on Al’s belly, but that’s been the way of it.

I try again, though, and this time I can feel him. First time ever.

So to catch people up, Alison and I are going to have a baby. Sometime in January. We know when the hell we conceived, but the doctors and midwives at the clinic have charts, tables, and special augur wheels they consult; and the ultrasound tech has her opinion, so we’re just playing along and suspending all travel plans between the first and fifteenth of January, which ought to cover us in the absence of something more definitive from the prenatal brain trust.

Alison’s showing in a big way. Today she wore a maternity top with horizontal stripes that made her look more pregnant than she ever has, which took me a second to absorb in a “Holy shit, I’m married and that’s my pregnant wife” sort of way. I suppose it was good to get the tactile sensation along with it a few hours later.

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